Correct maximum value for a bar chart?

Guideline: TO CUT OR NOT TO CUT (THE Y AXIS)
Source: * Rule 25: Always start your bar charts at zero — AddTwo (addtwodigital.com)*

Question:
Dear Community,

I have a problem with the visualisation of financial data. Specifically, it is about the share of “Green Bonds”. For those of you who are not familiar with this: An investor wants to have as high a share of these bonds as possible because they are specifically good.

My visualisation now looks like this:

You can see that the X-axis goes from 0% to 10%. I have found a lot of information that a bar chart should start at zero, otherwise the statement is misleading. My question now is this: Is it also misleading if the bar chart does not go up to 100%? If I were to create the chart from 0% to 100%, the small percentages would no longer be visible. However, if I create the chart from 0%- 10% and another chart from, say, 0%-5% (if the share of green bonds were 4%), the two charts could not be compared.

What is your opinion on this issue? Or does anyone have a suggestion for a visualisation method that is well suited for small percentages?

=> Is it also misleading if the bar chart does not go up to 100%
It’s not misleading, actually it’s better to adjust your scale according to your data values. Choosing the scale for a graph (although it mentions line charts, I think the same logic applies in this case). If the focus is not to compare the percentages with the whole, but only compare it amongst each other, it makes more sense to scale it to match your data values. By scaling your chart to 10%, it gives a better overview on the proportions and value difference between the different data.

=>Or does anyone have a suggestion for a visualisation method that is well suited for small percentages?
As long you want to compare the values to each other only, and minimize the scale while still capturing all of your data, working with small percentages is no different than working with different percentages.
Your visualisation indeed should include zero to encode the data value properly. Read more on that here
You’re not wrong going with vertical bar charts, you have long category names and have more space for them, in just a moment the view can easily see which bonds are doing better than others by ordering them. It’s suited when you have between 7-15 categories.

But you could also consider using a line chart. It displays trends better and includes the negative area, and you can easily compare different stocks to each other.
How to Visualize Your Stock Market and Sector Performance Portfolio. A drawback is that with too many lines it can become unreadable, unless the lines are well separated. Here the zero-baseline is not required.

I hope my reply was helpful to you.